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Thursday 2 March 2017

Texas Independence Day

Texas is popularly known as The Lone Star State. The lightning whelk is the official state shell.
In 1836, delegates from throughout what was then known as the Mexican Department of Texas convened at Washington-on-the-Brazos and signed the Texas Declaration of Independence. It was a bold move that divided Texans from their national government in Mexico City and birthed a new nation.
Though hastily gathered on the banks of the Brazos River, those delegates openly
declared a simple and basic truth: When a government ceases to protect the lives, liberty and property of the people from whom its legitimate powers are derived, that government becomes an instrument in the hands of evil rulers for the oppression of the people for whose happiness it was instituted.
From the fall of 1835 to spring 1836, Texans of all backgrounds banded together to continue the fight for liberty and freedom. It was a daunting struggle, and Texans endured great hardship and momentary setbacks, most notably at the Alamo and Goliad. But with determination and perseverance, Texan forces under Sam Houston defeated Santa Ana at San Jacinto. The war ended and the Republic of Texas was born.
Beginning with the issuance of the Declaration of Independence on March 2, 1836, the Republic of Texas stood as a free, sovereign and independent republic for nine years.
(March 2, 2012. Rick Perry, Governor of Texas.)
Some facts about Texas Independence. Dr. Larry Knight, Professor, Department of History, Political Science & Philosophy: The men defending the Alamo never knew that Texas had declared independence. Jose Antonio Navarro, for whom both Navarro County and Corsicana, Texas are named (the latter because his family immigrated from Corsica), was one of three Hispanics (two of whom were Tejanos) to sign the Declaration of Independence. Only one of the original 5 copies of the Texas Declaration of Independence remains; it was found at the U.S. State Department in 1896 and now resides in the Texas State Archives in Austin. The declaration was signed at what we call Washington on the Brazos, but it was called the Town of Washington at the time. Texas independence ensured the uniqueness of Texas, author John Steinbeck noted, "A Texan outside of Texas is a foreigner." Texas remained independent for almost 10 years: March 2, 1836 - December 29, 1845.
Texas is the only state to have the flags of 6 different nations fly over it. They are: Spain, France, Mexico, Republic of Texas, Confederate States, and the United States. Although six flags have flown over Texas, there have been eight changes of government: Spanish 1519-1685, French 1685-1690, Spanish 1690-1821, Mexican 1821-1836, Republic of Texas 1836-1845, United States 1845-1861, Confederate States 1861-1865, United States 1865 - present.
Source: texas.gov | tamuk.edu
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