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Thursday 27 May 2021 Calendar with holidays, observances and special days

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Holidays and observances

Events

  • 2016 – Barack Obama is the first president of United States to visit Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and meet Hibakusha.
  • 1996 – First Chechen War: the Russian President Boris Yeltsin meets with Chechnyan rebels for the first time and negotiates a cease-fire.
  • 1965 – Vietnam War: American warships begin the first bombardment of National Liberation Front targets within South Vietnam.
  • 1935 – New Deal: The Supreme Court of the United States declares the National Industrial Recovery Act to be unconstitutional in A.L.A. Schechter Poultry Corp. v. United States, (295 U.S. 495).
  • 1919 – The NC-4 aircraft arrives in Lisbon after completing the first transatlantic flight.
  • 1917 – Pope Benedict XV promulgates the 1917 Code of Canon Law, the first comprehensive codification of Catholic canon law in the legal history of the Catholic Church.
  • 1874 – The first group of Dorsland trekkers under the leadership of Gert Alberts leaves Pretoria.
  • 1863 – American Civil War: First Assault on the Confederate works at the Siege of Port Hudson.
  • 1813 – War of 1812: In Canada, American forces capture Fort George.
  • 927 – Death of Simeon I the Great, the first Bulgarian to be recognized as Emperor.

Births

  • 1990 – Chris Colfer, American actor and singer. Colfer's portrayal of Kurt received critical praise for which he has been the recipient of several awards, including Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Miniseries or Television Film at the 2011 Golden Globe Awards, and three consecutive People's Choice Awards for Favorite Comedic TV Actor in 2013, 2014 and 2015.
  • 1988 – Garrett Richards, American baseball pitcher. He previously played for the Los Angeles Angels.
  • 1988 – Tyler Sash, American football player (d. 2015), was an American football safety for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes and the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Giants in the sixth round of the 2011 NFL Draft.
  • 1988 – Vontae Davis, American football player. Vontae Ottis Davis (born May 27, 1988) is a former American football cornerback who played for the Miami Dolphins, Indianapolis Colts, and Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL).
  • 1984 – Blake Ahearn, American basketball player. He played college basketball for Missouri State.
  • 1979 – Michael Buonauro, American author and illustrator (d. 2004). Buonauro (May 27, 1979 – May 28, 2004), born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, was an American webcomic artist, and author.
  • 1978 – Adin Brown, American soccer player. He is currently the goalkeeping coach for the Portland Timbers of Major League Soccer.
  • 1975 – André 3000, American rapper. André Lauren Benjamin (born May 27, 1975), better known by his stage name André 3000 (formerly Dre, and not to be confused with Dr.
  • 1974 – Danny Wuerffel, American football player. Daniel Carl Wuerffel (born May 27, 1974) is a former college and professional American football quarterback who won the 1996 Heisman Trophy and the 1996 national football championship while playing college football for the University of Florida.
  • 1974 – Derek Webb, American singer-songwriter and guitarist. Derek Walsh Webb (born May 27, 1974) is an American singer-songwriter who first entered the music industry as a member of the band Caedmon's Call, and later embarked on a successful solo career.
  • 1973 – Jack McBrayer, American actor and comedian, was nominated for Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series at the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards. During his time at The Walt Disney Company, he has voiced the character Fix-It Felix in the 2012 film Wreck-It Ralph and later its 2018 sequel, as well as the title character Wander in Wander Over Yonder.
  • 1972 – Antonio Freeman, American football player. Antonio Michael Freeman (born May 27, 1972) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL), most notably for the Green Bay Packers.
  • 1972 – Todd Demsey, American golfer. Todd Demsey (born May 27, 1972) is an American professional golfer on the PGA Tour and 1993 NCAA champion.
  • 1971 – Lisa Lopes, American rapper and dancer (d. 2002), was an American hip hop recording artist, and dancer. Lopes was best known as one-third of the R&B girl group TLC, alongside Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins and Rozonda "Chilli" Thomas.
  • 1969 – Craig Federighi, American computer scientist and engineer. His teams are responsible for delivering the software at the heart of Apple's products, including the user interface, applications and frameworks.
  • 1969 – Jeremy Mayfield, American race car driver. Taylor, Cale Yarborough, Michael Kranefuss, Roger Penske, Ray Evernham, Bill Davis, and Gene Haas.
  • 1969 – Todd Hundley, American baseball player. Todd Randolph Hundley (born May 27, 1969) is a former Major League Baseball catcher and outfielder.
  • 1968 – Jeff Bagwell, American baseball player and coach. Jeffrey Robert Bagwell (born May 27, 1968) is an American former professional baseball first baseman and coach who spent his entire 15-year Major League Baseball (MLB) playing career with the Houston Astros.
  • 1967 – Eddie McClintock, American actor. Edward Theodore McClintock, known as Eddie McClintock, is an American actor who has starred and guest-starred in numerous television shows.
  • 1964 – Adam Carolla, American actor, producer, and screenwriter. Adam Carolla (born May 27, 1964) is an American comedian, radio personality, television host, actor, podcaster, and director.
  • 1961 – Peri Gilpin, American actress. She portrayed Roz Doyle in the U.S. television series Frasier, and Kim Keeler in the ABC Family television drama Make It or Break It.
  • 1957 – Eddie Harsch, Canadian-American keyboard player and bass player (d. 2016), was a Canadian keyboardist and member of Detroit-based jam band Bulldog. Previous to that he was The Black Crowes' keyboardist from 1991 to 2006.
  • 1956 – Cynthia McFadden, American journalist. Cynthia McFadden (born May 27, 1956) is an American television journalist who is currently the senior legal and investigative correspondent for NBC News.
  • 1956 – Rosemary Squire, English producer and manager, co-founded Ambassador Theatre Group. Dame Rosemary Anne Squire, DBE (born 27 May 1956) is a British commercial theatre owner and entrepreneur.
  • 1955 – Eric Bischoff, American wrestler, manager, and producer. Eric Aaron Bischoff (born May 27, 1955) is an American entrepreneur, television producer, professional wrestling booker, podcast host, and on-screen personality.
  • 1955 – Richard Schiff, American actor, director, and producer. Schiff made his directorial debut with The West Wing, directing an episode entitled "Talking Points".
  • 1954 – Jackie Slater, American football player and coach, was an offensive tackle for 20 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played his entire career with the Rams franchise: 19 seasons in Los Angeles from 1976–1994, and one in St.
  • 1950 – Dee Dee Bridgewater, American singer-songwriter and actress. Dee Dee Bridgewater (née Denise Garrett, May 27, 1950) is an American jazz singer.
  • 1947 – Peter DeFazio, American politician. He is a member of the Democratic Party.
  • 1944 – Chris Dodd, American lawyer and politician. Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lobbyist, lawyer, and Democratic Party politician who served as a United States Senator from Connecticut from 1981 to 2011.
  • 1943 – Bruce Weitz, American actor. Weitz won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series in 1984 for his role in the series.
  • 1942 – Lee Baca, American police officer. Leroy David "Lee" Baca (born May 27, 1942) is an American former sheriff of Los Angeles County, California.
  • 1939 – Don Williams, American singer-songwriter and guitarist, was an American country singer, songwriter, and 2010 inductee to the Country Music Hall of Fame. He began his solo career in 1971, singing popular ballads and amassing 17 number one country hits.
  • 1937 – Allan Carr, American playwright and producer (d. 1999), was an American producer and manager of stage for the screen. Carr was nominated for numerous awards, winning a Tony Award and two People's Choice Awards, and was named Producer of the Year by the National Association of Theatre Owners.
  • 1936 – Louis Gossett, Jr., American actor and producer. Gossett has also starred in numerous other film productions including A Raisin in the Sun, The Landlord, Skin Game, Travels with My Aunt, The Laughing Policeman, The Deep, Jaws 3-D, Wolfgang Petersen's Enemy Mine, the Iron Eagle series, Toy Soldiers and The Punisher, in an acting career that spans over five decades.
  • 1935 – Daniel Colchico, American football player and coach (d. 2014), was an American athlete who played defensive end in the National Football League.
  • 1935 – Lee Meriwether, American model and actress, Miss America 1955. The role earned her two Golden Globe Award nominations in 1975 and 1976, and an Emmy Award nomination in 1977.
  • 1935 – Ramsey Lewis, American jazz pianist and composer. Ramsey Lewis has recorded over 80 albums and has received five gold records and three Grammy Awards so far in his career.
  • 1934 – Harlan Ellison, American author and screenwriter, was an American writer, known for his prolific and influential work in New Wave speculative fiction, and for his outspoken, combative personality. Robert Bloch, the author of Psycho, described Ellison as "the only living organism I know whose natural habitat is hot water".
  • 1934 – Ray Daviault, Canadian-American baseball player. He stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 175 pounds (79 kg).
  • 1931 – Philip Kotler, American author and professor. Johnson Distinguished Professor of International Marketing at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.
  • 1930 – John Barth, American novelist and short story writer. John Simmons Barth (/bɑːrθ/; born May 27, 1930) is an American writer who is best known for his postmodernist and metafictional fiction.
  • 1930 – William S. Sessions, American civil servant and judge, 8th Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He is the father of former Texas Congressman Pete Sessions.
  • 1928 – Thea Musgrave, Scottish-American composer and educator. She has lived in the United States since 1972.
  • 1925 – Tony Hillerman, American journalist and author (d. 2008), was an American author of detective novels and non-fiction works best known for his Navajo Tribal Police mystery novels. Several of his works have been adapted as theatrical and television movies.
  • 1923 – Henry Kissinger, German-American political scientist and politician, 56th United States Secretary of State, Nobel Prize laureate. Henry Alfred Kissinger (/ˈkɪsɪndʒər/; German: ; born Heinz Alfred Kissinger; May 27, 1923) is an American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant who served as United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor under the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.
  • 1923 – Sumner Redstone, American businessman and philanthropist. Through National Amusements, Redstone and his family are majority voting shareholders of ViacomCBS (itself the parent company of CBS, MTV, TV Land, VidCon, Smithsonian Channel, CBS Television Studios, CBS Productions, Showtime Networks, Nickelodeon, Paramount Network, Big Ticket Television, ViacomCBS Domestic Media Networks, ViacomCBS Networks International, Comedy Central, Paramount Pictures, Miramax, CBS Television Stations, Network 10 and TV distributor CBS Television Distribution).
  • 1922 – John D. Vanderhoof, American banker and politician, 37th Governor of Colorado (d. 2013), was an American politician. A member of the Republican Party, Vanderhoof served as the 37th Governor of Colorado from 1973-1975, assuming the office from John Arthur Love, who was appointed to the National Energy Policy Office by President Richard Nixon.
  • 1915 – Herman Wouk, American novelist, was an American author best known for historical fiction such as The Caine Mutiny (1951) which won the Pulitzer Prize.
  • 1912 – John Cheever, American novelist and short story writer (d. 1982). He is sometimes called "the Chekhov of the suburbs." His fiction is mostly set in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, the Westchester suburbs, old New England villages based on various South Shore towns around Quincy, Massachusetts, where he was born, and Italy, especially Rome.
  • 1912 – Sam Snead, American golfer and sportscaster (d. 2002), was an American professional golfer who was one of the top players in the world for the better part of four decades (having won PGA of America and Senior PGA Tour events over six decades) and widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time. Snead was awarded a record 94 gold medallions, for wins in PGA of America (referred to by most as the PGA) Tour events and later credited with winning a record 82 PGA Tour events, including seven majors.
  • 1911 – Hubert Humphrey, American journalist and politician, 38th Vice President of the United States (d. 1978), was an American politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969. He twice served in the United States Senate, representing Minnesota from 1949 to 1964 and 1971 to 1978.
  • 1911 – Vincent Price, American actor (d. 1993), was an American actor best known for his performances in horror films, although his career spanned other genres, including film noir, drama, mystery, thriller, and comedy. He appeared on stage, television, and radio, and in more than 100 films.
  • 1909 – Dolores Hope, American singer and philanthropist (d. 2011), was an American singer, entertainer, philanthropist and wife/widow of American actor and comedian Bob Hope.
  • 1907 – Nicolas Calas, Swiss-American poet and critic (d. 1988), was the pseudonym of Nikos Kalamaris (Νίκος Καλαμάρης), a Greek-American poet and art critic. While living in Greece, he also used the pseudonyms Nikitas Randos (Νικήτας Ράντος) and M.
  • 1907 – Rachel Carson, American biologist, environmentalist, and author (d. 1964), was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.
  • 1898 – David Crosthwait, African-American engineer, inventor and writer (d. 1976). He was born in the city of Nashville, Tennessee.
  • 1897 – Dink Templeton, American rugby player and coach (d. 1962), was an American track and field athlete, Olympic gold medalist in rugby union, college football player, and track coach.
  • 1894 – Dashiell Hammett, American detective novelist and screenwriter (d. 1961), was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories. He was also a screenwriter and political activist.
  • 1883 – Jessie Arms Botke, American painter (d. 1971), was an Illinois and California painter noted for her bird images and use of gold leaf highlights.
  • 1879 – Karl Bühler, German-American linguist and psychologist (d. 1963), was a German psychologist and linguist. In psychology he is known for his work in gestalt psychology, and he was one of the founders of the Würzburg School of psychology.
  • 1837 – Wild Bill Hickok, American police officer (d. 1876), was a folk hero of the American Old West known for his work across the frontier as a drover, wagon master, soldier, spy, scout, lawman, gunfighter, gambler, showman, and actor. He earned a great deal of notoriety in his own time, much of it bolstered by the many outlandish and often fabricated tales that he told about his life.
  • 1836 – Jay Gould, American businessman and financier (d. 1892), was an American railroad magnate and financial speculator who is generally identified as one of the robber barons of the Gilded Age. His sharp and often unscrupulous business practices made him one of the wealthiest men of the late nineteenth century.
  • 1832 – Zenas Ferry Moody, American surveyor and politician, 7th Governor of Oregon (d. 1917), was the seventh Governor of Oregon from 1882 to 1887.
  • 1819 – Julia Ward Howe, American poet and songwriter (d. 1910), was an American poet and author, known for writing "The Battle Hymn of the Republic". She was also an advocate for abolitionism and a social activist, particularly for women's suffrage.
  • 1818 – Amelia Bloomer, American journalist and activist (d. 1894), was an American women's rights and temperance advocate. Even though she did not create the women's clothing reform style known as bloomers, her name became associated with it because of her early and strong advocacy.
  • 1814 – John Rudolph Niernsee, Viennese-born American architect (d.1885). He served as the head architect for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B. & O.).
  • 1794 – Cornelius Vanderbilt, American businessman and philanthropist (d. 1877), was an American business magnate who built his wealth in railroads and shipping. After working with his father's business, Vanderbilt worked his way into leadership positions in the inland water trade and invested in the rapidly growing railroad industry.
  • 1738 – Nathaniel Gorham, American merchant and politician, 14th President of the Continental Congress (d. 1796), was a politician and merchant from Massachusetts. He was a delegate from Massachusetts to the Continental Congress, and for six months served as the presiding officer of that body.

Deaths

  • 2017 – Gregg Allman, American musician, singer and songwriter (b. 1947)
  • 2015 – Michael Martin, American philosopher and academic (b. 1932)
  • 2014 – Massimo Vignelli, Italian-American graphic designer (b. 1931)
  • 2014 – Roberto Vargas, Puerto Rican-American baseball player, coach, and manager (b. 1929)
  • 2012 – David Rimoin, Canadian-American geneticist and academic (b. 1936)
  • 2011 – Gil Scott-Heron, American singer-songwriter and poet (b. 1949)
  • 2011 – Jeff Conaway, American actor and singer (b. 1950)
  • 2011 – Margo Dydek, Polish-American basketball player (b. 1974)
  • 2009 – Carol Anne O'Marie, American nun and author (b. 1933)
  • 2009 – Clive Granger, Welsh-American economist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1934)
  • 2009 – Gérard Jean-Juste, Haitian-American priest and theologian (b. 1946)
  • 2009 – Mona Grey, British nursing administrator; Northern Ireland's first Chief Nursing Officer
  • 2009 – Paul Sharratt, English-American television host (b. 1933)
  • 2009 – Thomas M. Franck, American lawyer and academic (b. 1931)
  • 2007 – Ed Yost, American inventor, created the hot air balloon (b. 1919)
  • 2007 – Gretchen Wyler, American actress and dancer (b. 1932)
  • 2006 – Craig Heyward, American football player (b. 1966)
  • 2006 – Paul Gleason, American actor (b. 1939)
  • 2006 – Rob Borsellino, American journalist (b. 1949)
  • 1992 – Uncle Charlie Osborne, American fiddler (b. 1890)
  • 1990 – Robert B. Meyner, American lawyer and politician, 44th Governor of New Jersey (b. 1908)
  • 1987 – John Howard Northrop, American biochemist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1891)
  • 1986 – Ismail al-Faruqi, Palestinian-American philosopher and academic (b. 1921)
  • 1969 – Jeffrey Hunter, American actor and producer (b. 1926)
  • 1967 – W. Otto Miessner, American composer and educator (b. 1880)
  • 1960 – James Montgomery Flagg, American painter and illustrator (b. 1877)
  • 1953 – Jesse Burkett, American baseball player and manager (b. 1868)
  • 1949 – Robert Ripley, American cartoonist, publisher, and businessman, founded Ripley's Believe It or Not! (b. 1890)
  • 1947 – Ed Konetchy, American baseball player and manager (b. 1885)
  • 1867 – Thomas Bulfinch American mythologist (b. 1796)
  • 1831 – Jedediah Smith, American hunter, explorer, and author (b. 1799)
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