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Wednesday 13 October 2021 Calendar with holidays, observances and special days

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Holidays and observances

Events

  • 1983 – Ameritech Mobile Communications (now AT&T) launched the first US cellular network in Chicago.
  • 1976 – The first electron micrograph of an Ebola viral particle is obtained by Dr. F. A. Murphy, now at U.C. Davis, who was then working at the C.D.C.
  • 1967 – The first game in the history of the American Basketball Association is played as the Anaheim Amigos lose to the Oakland Oaks 134–129 in Oakland, California.
  • 1911 – Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, becomes the first Governor General of Canada of royal descent.
  • 1903 – The Boston Red Sox win the first modern World Series, defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates in the eighth game.
  • 1892 – Edward Emerson Barnard discovers D/1892 T1, the first comet discovered by photographic means, on the night of October 13–14.
  • 1885 – The Georgia Institute of Technology is founded in Atlanta, Georgia, United States.
  • 1881 – First known conversation in modern Hebrew by Eliezer Ben-Yehuda and friends.
  • 1812 – War of 1812: Battle of Queenston Heights: As part of the Niagara campaign in Ontario, Canada, United States forces under General Stephen Van Rensselaer are repulsed from invading Canada by British and native troops led by Sir Isaac Brock.
  • 1793 – French Revolutionary Wars: Austro-Prussian victory over Republican France at the First Battle of Wissembourg
  • 1792 – In Washington, D.C., the cornerstone of the United States Executive Mansion (known as the White House since 1818) is laid.
  • 1775 – The United States Continental Congress orders the establishment of the Continental Navy (the predecessor organization of the United States Navy).
  • 1773 – The Whirlpool Galaxy is discovered by Charles Messier.
  • In 2016, using 3D imaging techniques on 20 years of photographs by the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers estimate there are 2 trillion galaxies in the observable universe, about 10 times more than previously thought.

Births

  • 1981 – Taylor Buchholz, American baseball player. Taylor Buchholz (born October 13, 1981) is an American former professional baseball pitcher.
  • 1978 – Jermaine O'Neal, American basketball player. O'Neal was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers with the 17th overall pick, but was unable to break into the first team in Portland and was traded to the Indiana Pacers in 2000.
  • 1977 – Benjamin Clapp, American drummer. He has performed, composed, and recorded music with numerous artists, most notably Erik Sanko (The Lounge Lizards) and Skeleton Key, Tom Marshall (Phish) and Amfibian, Anthony Krizan (Spin Doctors), Jim Breuer, Kronos Quartet, Jesse Blaze Snider and Baptized By Fire, Dee Snider (Twisted Sister), Billy Martin (Medeski Martin and Wood), David Peel (The Lower East Side), and White Trash.
  • 1977 – Paul Pierce, American basketball player. Paul Anthony Pierce (born October 13, 1977) is an American former professional basketball player who played 19 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA).
  • 1973 – Brian Dawkins, American football player and coach. Brian Patrick Dawkins Sr. (born October 13, 1973) is a former American football safety who played 16 seasons in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the Philadelphia Eagles.
  • 1972 – Summer Sanders, American swimmer and sportscaster. Summer Elisabeth Sanders OLY (born October 13, 1972) is an American former competition swimmer and Olympic champion from 1992.
  • 1971 – Billy Bush, American television journalist and radio host. William Hall Bush (born October 13, 1971) is an American former radio and current television host, and a member of the Bush family, which includes two former U.S. presidents and other political figures.
  • 1970 – Serena Altschul, American journalist. Serena Altschul (born October 13, 1970) is an American broadcast journalist, known for her work at MTV News and CBS.
  • 1969 – Cady McClain, American actress and singer. Cady McClain (born Katie Jo McClain; October 13, 1969) is an American actress, singer, and author.
  • 1969 – Nancy Kerrigan, American figure skater and actress. Kerrigan was inducted into the United States Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 2004.
  • 1968 – Tisha Campbell-Martin, American actress and singer. Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and raised in New Jersey, she made her screen debut appearing in the 1986 rock musical comedy film Little Shop of Horrors, and later went to star on the short-lived NBC musical comedy drama Rags to Riches (1987–1988).
  • 1967 – Trevor Hoffman, American baseball player and manager. Trevor William Hoffman (born October 13, 1967) is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher, who played 18 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1993 to 2010.
  • 1966 – Larry Collmus, American sportscaster. Larry Collmus (born October 13, 1966) is a Thoroughbred horse racing announcer.
  • 1964 – Christopher Judge, American actor and producer. Douglas Christopher Judge (born October 13, 1964) is an American actor best known for playing Teal'c in the Canadian-American military science fiction television series Stargate SG-1.
  • 1963 – Chip Foose, American engineer and television host. Chip Foose (born October 13, 1963) is an American automobile designer, artist, and star of Velocity's reality television series Overhaulin'.
  • 1963 – Colin Channer, Jamaican-American author and academic. Colin Channer (born 13 October 1963) is a Jamaican writer, often referred to as "Bob Marley with a pen," due to the spiritual, sensual, social themes presented from a literary Jamaican perspective.
  • 1962 – Jerry Rice, American football player and sportscaster, was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the San Francisco 49ers. Due to his numerous records, accomplishments, and accolades, he is widely regarded as the greatest wide receiver in NFL history.
  • 1962 – Kelly Preston, American actress. Kelly Kamalelehua Smith (born October 13, 1962), better known by her stage name Kelly Preston, is an American actress and former model.
  • 1962 – T'Keyah Crystal Keymáh, American actress and author. In addition to her status as an original cast member of the Fox sketch comedy series In Living Color (1990–1994), she is also known for her roles as Erica Lucas on the CBS sitcom Cosby (1996–2000), and as Tanya Baxter on the Disney Channel sitcom That's So Raven (2003–2005).
  • 1961 – Doc Rivers, American basketball player and coach. Glenn Anton "Doc" Rivers (born October 13, 1961) is an American basketball coach and former player who is the head coach for the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association (NBA).
  • 1960 – Ari Fleischer, American journalist and politician, 24th White House Press Secretary. As press secretary in the Bush administration, Fleischer was a prominent advocate for the Invasion of Iraq, and made numerous exaggerated and misleading claims about Iraq in the lead-up to the Iraq War.
  • 1960 – Joey Belladonna, American singer-songwriter. Joey Belladonna (born Joseph Bellardini, October 30, 1960) is an American thrash metal musician, best known as the vocalist for the thrash metal band Anthrax.
  • 1960 – Peter Keisler, American lawyer and politician, United States Attorney General. Peter Douglas Keisler (born October 13, 1960 in Hempstead, New York) is an American lawyer whose 2006 nomination by President George W.
  • 1960 – Tim Brewster, American football player and coach. In 2011, Brewster was a sideline analyst for Fox College Football and the NFL on Fox with Gus Johnson and Charles Davis.
  • 1959 – Marie Osmond, American singer, actress, and television spokesperson. Her best known song is a remake of the country pop ballad "Paper Roses".
  • 1958 – Jair-Rôhm Parker Wells, American bassist and composer. He lived in Stockholm, Sweden, from 1985 until 2010.
  • 1958 – Maria Cantwell, American lawyer and politician. Maria Elaine Cantwell /ˈkæntˌwɛl/ (born October 13, 1958) is an American politician serving as the junior United States Senator from Washington, first elected in 2000.
  • 1957 – Reggie Theus, American basketball player and coach. Reginald Wayne Theus (born October 13, 1957) is an American retired basketball player and the former head coach of California State University, Northridge.
  • 1956 – Don Paige, American runner. Paige (born October 13, 1956) is an American retired middle distance runner.
  • 1955 – John Ferenzik, American keyboard player, guitarist, and composer. He has performed most notably with Todd Rundgren (on keyboards, vocals and electric guitar), and also Jefferson Starship (on keyboards, electric guitar, and bass guitar).
  • 1954 – George Frazier, American baseball player and sportscaster, was an American journalist.
  • 1952 – Mundo Earwood, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (d. 2014), was an American country music singer-songwriter. Earwood's eponymous debut album was released by Excelsior Records in 1981.
  • 1950 – Mollie Katzen, American chef and author. She later authored and illustrated several other best-selling vegetarian cookbooks, including The Enchanted Broccoli Forest (1982), Still Life with Menu (1988), and Vegetable Heaven and Sunlight Cafe (1997); three children's cookbooks (Pretend Soup (1994), Honest Pretzels (1999), and Salad People (2005) and recently co-authored (with Walter Willett) Eat, Drink and Weigh Less: A Flexible and Delicious Way to Shrink Your Waist Without Going Hungry.
  • 1949 – Tom Mees, American sportscaster (d. 1996). Mees (October 13, 1949 – August 14, 1996) was an American sportscaster best known for his play-by-play of professional and collegiate ice hockey and for being a prominent personality on ESPN during that network's early years.
  • 1947 – Sammy Hagar, American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer. Samuel Roy Hagar (born October 13, 1947), also known as The Red Rocker, is an American rock vocalist, songwriter, musician, and entrepreneur.
  • 1946 – Lacy J. Dalton, American country music singer-songwriter and guitarist. Dalton (born Jill Lynne Byrem; October 13, 1946, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania) is an American country singer and songwriter.
  • 1944 – Robert Lamm, American singer-songwriter, pianist, and producer. Lamm is one of three founding members (alongside James Pankow and Lee Loughnane) still performing with the group.
  • 1943 – Peter Sauber, Swiss businessman, founded the Sauber F1 Team. Peter Sauber (born 13 October 1943) is a retired Swiss motorsport executive.
  • 1942 – Jerry Jones, American businessman. Jerral Wayne "Jerry" Jones (born October 13, 1942) is an American billionaire businessman and has been the owner of the National Football League (NFL)'s Dallas Cowboys since 1989.
  • 1942 – Rutanya Alda, Latvian-American actress. She also appeared in a lead role in the horror films Amityville II: The Possession (1982) and Girls Nite Out (1984).
  • 1941 – Paul Simon, American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer. He reached fame and commercial success as half of the duo Simon & Garfunkel, formed in 1956 with Art Garfunkel (the duo was originally known as Tom & Jerry).
  • 1940 – Pharoah Sanders, American saxophonist and bandleader. He has released over 30 albums as a leader and has collaborated extensively with Leon Thomas, Alice Coltrane and Tisziji Muñoz, among others.
  • 1939 – Melinda Dillon, American actress. Her other film appearances include Bound for Glory (1976), F.I.S.T. (1978), A Christmas Story (1983), Harry and the Hendersons (1987), The Prince of Tides (1991) and Magnolia (1999).
  • 1938 – Shirley Caesar, American gospel singer-songwriter. Shirley Ann Caesar-Williams, known professionally as Shirley Caesar (born October 13, 1938 in Durham, North Carolina), is an American Gospel music singer, songwriter and recording artist whose career has spanned seven decades.
  • 1935 – Bruce Morrow, American radio host and actor. Bruce Morrow (born Bruce Meyerowitz on October 13, 1935) is an American radio performer, known for some professional purposes as Cousin Brucie.
  • 1935 – Etterlene DeBarge, American singer-songwriter. Etterlene Louise DeBarge–Rodriguez (born Etterlene Louise Abney; October 13, 1935) is an American gospel singer, songwriter, and matriarch of the American R&B/Soul vocal group DeBarge.
  • 1932 – Johnny Lytle, American vibraphone player and drummer (d. 1995), was a jazz drummer and vibraphonist.
  • 1931 – Eddie Mathews, American baseball player and manager (d. 2001). Inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1978, he is the only player to have represented the Braves in the three American cities they have called home.
  • 1930 – Bruce Geller, American screenwriter and producer (d. 1978), was an American lyricist, screenwriter, director, and television producer.
  • 1929 – Richard Howard, American poet, critic, and translator. Richard Joseph Howard (born October 13, 1929; adopted as Richard Joseph Orwitz) is an American poet, literary critic, essayist, teacher, and translator.
  • 1929 – Walasse Ting, Chinese-American painter and poet (d. 2010), was a Chinese-American visual artist and poet. His colorful paintings have attracted critical admiration and a popular following.
  • 1927 – Lee Konitz, American saxophonist and composer. Lee Konitz (born October 13, 1927) is an American composer and alto saxophonist.
  • 1926 – Eddie Yost, American baseball player and coach (d. 2012). He played the majority of his Major League Baseball career as a third baseman for the Washington Senators, then played two seasons each with the Detroit Tigers and the Los Angeles Angels before retiring in 1962.
  • 1925 – Lenny Bruce, American comedian and actor (d. 1966), was an American stand-up comedian, social critic, and satirist. He was renowned for his open, freestyle, and critical form of comedy which integrated satire, politics, religion, sex, and vulgarity.
  • 1924 – Terry Gibbs, American vibraphone player and bandleader. Terry Gibbs (born Julius Gubenko, October 13, 1924) is an American jazz vibraphonist and band leader.
  • 1923 – John C. Champion, American screenwriter and producer (d. 1994). Champion (October 13, 1923 in Denver, Colorado, United States – October 3, 1994 in Tarzana, California, US) was an American producer and screenwriter.
  • 1922 – Nathaniel Clifton, American athlete (d. 1990), was an American multi-sport athlete best known as one of the first African Americans to play in the National Basketball Association (NBA).
  • 1920 – Laraine Day, American actress (d. 2007), was an American actress, radio and television commentator and a former Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract star. As a leading lady, she was paired opposite major film stars including Lana Turner, Cary Grant, Ronald Reagan, Kirk Douglas, and John Wayne.
  • 1919 – Jackie Ronne, American explorer (d. 2009), was an American explorer of Antarctica and the first woman in the world to be a working member of an Antarctic expedition (1947–48). She is also the namesake of the Ronne Ice Shelf.
  • 1917 – George Osmond, American talent manager (d. 2007), was the patriarch of the singing Osmond family.
  • 1912 – Cornel Wilde, Slovak-American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter (d. 1989), was a Hungarian-American actor and film director.
  • 1909 – Art Tatum, American jazz pianist (d. 1956). Tatum grew up in Toledo, Ohio, where he began playing piano professionally and had his own radio program, rebroadcast nationwide, while still in his teens.
  • 1909 – Herblock, American author and illustrator (d. 2001), was an American editorial cartoonist and author best known for his commentaries on national domestic and foreign policy.
  • 1902 – Arna Bontemps, American librarian, author, and poet (d. 1973), was an American poet, novelist and librarian, and a noted member of the Harlem Renaissance.
  • 1900 – Gerald Marks, American composer (d. 1997), was an American composer from Saginaw, Michigan. He was best known for the song "All of Me" which he co-wrote with Seymour Simons and has been recorded about 2,000 times.
  • 1895 – Mike Gazella, American baseball player and manager (d. 1978), was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s.
  • 1891 – Irene Rich, American actress (d. 1988), was an American actress who worked in both silent films and talkies, as well as radio.
  • 1890 – Conrad Richter, American journalist and novelist (d. 1968), was an American novelist whose lyrical work is concerned largely with life on the American frontier in various periods. His novel The Town (1950), the last story of his trilogy The Awakening Land about the Ohio frontier, won the 1951 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
  • 1879 – Edward Hennig, American gymnast (d. 1960), was an American gymnast who competed in the 1904 Summer Olympics. He died in Summit County, Ohio.
  • 1876 – Rube Waddell, American baseball player (d. 1914), was an American southpaw pitcher in Major League Baseball (MLB). In a career spanning 13 years, he played for the Louisville Colonels (1897, 1899), Pittsburgh Pirates (1900–01) and Chicago Orphans (1901) in the National League, and the Philadelphia Athletics (1902–07) and St.
  • 1872 – Leon Leonwood Bean, American hunter, businessman, and author, founded L.L.Bean (d. 1967), was an American inventor, author, outdoor enthusiast, and founder of the company L.L.Bean.
  • 1870 – Albert Jay Nock, American theorist, author, and critic (d. 1945), was an American libertarian author, editor first of The Freeman and then The Nation, educational theorist, Georgist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century. He was an outspoken opponent of the New Deal, and served as a fundamental inspiration for the modern libertarian and conservative movements, cited as an influence by William F.
  • 1825 – Charles Frederick Worth, English fashion designer, founded House of Worth (d. 1895), was an English fashion designer who founded the House of Worth, one of the foremost fashion houses of the 19th and early 20th centuries. He is considered by many fashion historians to be the father of haute couture.

Deaths

  • 2015 – Rosalyn Baxandall, American historian, author, and academic (b. 1939)
  • 2014 – John Bradfield, English biologist and businessman, founded Cambridge Science Park (b. 1925)
  • 2014 – Margaret Hillert, American author and poet (b. 1920)
  • 2013 – Joe Meriweather, American basketball player and coach (b. 1953)
  • 2011 – Barbara Kent, Canadian-born American actress (b. 1907)
  • 2010 – Vernon Biever, American photographer (b. 1923)
  • 2009 – Stephen Barnett, American scholar and academic (b. 1935)
  • 2005 – Vivian Malone Jones, American activist (b. 1942)
  • 2002 – Stephen Ambrose, American historian and author (b. 1936)
  • 2000 – Jean Peters, American actress (b. 1926)
  • 1992 – James Marshall, American author and illustrator (b. 1942)
  • 1990 – Hans Namuth, German-American photographer (b. 1915)
  • 1987 – Walter Houser Brattain, American physicist and engineer, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1902)
  • 1974 – Ed Sullivan, American journalist and talk show host (b. 1901)
  • 1974 – Otto Binder, American author (b. 1911)
  • 1968 – Bea Benaderet, American actress and voice artist (b. 1906)
  • 1966 – Clifton Webb, American actor and dancer (b. 1889)
  • 1950 – Ernest Haycox, American soldier and author (b. 1899)
  • 1945 – Milton S. Hershey, American businessman, founded The Hershey Company (b. 1857)
  • 1938 – E. C. Segar, American cartoonist, created Popeye (b. 1894)
  • 1930 – T. Alexander Harrison, American painter and educator (b. 1853)
  • 1917 – Florence La Badie, American actress (b. 1888)
  • 1890 – Samuel Freeman Miller, American lawyer and jurist (b. 1816)
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